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The cutest cat in the world

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All cat breeds in alphabetic order. Click on the name for more info and picture of that breed.

  • Abyssinian Cat

    A love of heights is a signal trait of the Abyssinian. He likes to be as high up as possible and will appreciate having one or more ceiling-height cat trees

     

    Personality

     

    Abyssinians aren't for those who want decorative cats to match the rust-colored carpet, or for those who want cats that enjoy being picked up and cuddled. Courageous, curious, and high-spirited, when restrained Abys tend to become struggling bundles of fur with more than the usual number of elbows; however, that's not to say that Abyssinians are aloof or standoffish. While Abyssinians will cheerfully entertain themselves, they are most happy when involved in every aspect of your life. They are particularly involved at dinnertime. In fact, you'll know it's dinnertime when small, furry, food-seeking missiles attach themselves to your legs!

    Abyssinians regularly perform antics for your amusement, earning them the reputation of being the clowns of the cat kingdom. They will often perch on shoulders, crawl under covers, and sit on laps purring madly before racing off to bat imaginary butterflies and make flying leaps at the tallest bookcases. Natural athletes, no closed room or cupboard is safe from their agile paws and inquiring minds.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Abyssinian is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He’s smart enough to get out of the way of toddlers but loves school-age children because they are a match for his energy level and curiosity. Nothing scares him, certainly not dogs, and he will happily make friends with them if they don’t give him any trouble. Abys have also been known to get along with large parrots, ferrets and other animals. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • American Bobtail Cat

    With his short tail, tufted ears and toes, and powerful body, the American Bobtail has a distinctively wild look.

     

    Personality

     

    While the breed is still developing, breeders say that Bobtails are playful, energetic, and friendly, and possess an uncanny intelligence for Houdini-type escapes from closed rooms and fastened cages. Very people-oriented, they are not above demanding human attention by meowing or commandeering available laps.

    On the cat activity scale (with, perhaps, the Persian as a serene '1' and the Abyssinian as an animated '10'), the Bobtail rates a 7 or 8 ' fun-loving and frisky but not overactive.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The social and laidback American Bobtail likes to play, so he’s a good choice for families with children. Always supervise younger children to make sure they don’t hurt the cat by pulling his fur or twisting his tail.

     

    He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together

  • American Shorthair Cat

    The adaptable and good-natured American Shorthair retains his hunting ability, but these days he is more likely to be a family companion.

     

    Personality

     

    When describing the American Shorthair, the expression 'happy medium' springs to mind. These all-American cats are medium in size, build, type, and temperament; neither too big nor small, not overly cuddly nor distant, neither couch potatoes nor hyperactive. Breeders note that the American Short-hair is the perfect breed for the person who wants a cat that enjoys being in your lap but not in your face. American Shorthairs are known for their quiet voices and adaptable personalities; they are sociable, easily trained, and adapt well to other animals and children. They generally do not like to be picked up; like their Pilgrim companions who left England to find independence, they cherish their freedom.

    Because of the American Shorthair's history as a working cat, they make great companions in terms of health, strength, and vitality. With proper care Americans enjoy long life spans, generally between 15 and 20 years.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The laidback but playful American Shorthair is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He can learn tricks and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He will get along fine with dogs if they don’t give him any trouble. He is a skilled hunter, but may learn to leave pet birds or other small animals alone if he is introduced to them at an early age. When in doubt, however, separation is best. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

     

  • American Curl Cat Personality

    The Curl stands out for his distinctively shaped ears, but even without them he is a striking cat with a sweet expression.

     

    Personality

     

    Curls have qualities other than the whimsical ears to make them attractive pets. They are people cats that do not show any of the stereotypical aloofness, and are affectionate without harassing people for attention the way some breeds can. They delight in perching on shoulders and love to pat and nuzzle their peoples' faces. Curls are a 'fetching' breed, easily taught to play fetch, and never lose their love of play. They are also noted for their affinity with children.

    While not as active as the Abyssinian, American Curls are playful and energetic. They also display the typical cat curiosity and want to be right there to investigate any changes in their environment.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Curl is sweet toward children, making him a good choice for families who will supervise children to make sure they pet the cat nicely and don’t pull his ears or tail. He is happy to live with cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

     

  • American Wirehair

    Sproing! That’s not the typical reaction we expect when we pet a cat, but his springy, resilient coat is part and parcel of the American Wirehair’s charm and good looks.

     

    Personality

     

    Wirehairs are people cats that crave human attention and affection. They are active without being hyper, and affectionate without being clingy. They exhibit a keen interest in their surroundings, want to be involved in every aspect of your day, and will follow you from room to room to keep an eye on proceedings. Fanciers say that they seem particularly in tune with their families' feelings and try to offer comfort and companionship when their chosen family member is feeling blue. That's when they turn on the purrs and sit beside them to offer their support.

    As cats go, Wirehairs have a genuine sense of humor, and love to be the centers of attention. Agile and fun-loving, they enjoy playing the clown and are generally more playful and active than the American Shorthair.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The easygoing but playful American Wirehair is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He can learn tricks and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He will get along fine with dogs if they don’t give him any trouble. He is a skilled hunter, but may learn to leave pet birds or other small animals alone if he is introduced to them at an early age. When in doubt, however, separation is best. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting

     

  • Balenese Cat

    Named for the exotically graceful dancers on the Indonesian island of Bali, the Balinese is a long haired variety of Siamese.

     

    Personality

     

    Balinese cats are smart, sweet, and fun to be around. Like the Siamese, they are known for their ability to communicate vocally, sometimes nonstop, and therefore this breed is not for everyone. Highly social, Balinese are sensitive to your moods and feelings and are more than willing to cheer you up with some happy chatter if you're feeling gloomy.

    They are agile leapers and will often ride on their people's shoulders. They love to play and easily learn to fetch, bringing the ball or toy back for repeated throwing. They will keep you entertained with their antics, but possess a loving disposition as well. They can be quite assertive in their requests for attention, but also possess a special dignity particular to the Balinese and Siamese breeds.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Balinese is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Bengal

    The Bengal could never be called delicate. He is an athlete: agile and graceful with a strong, muscular body, as befits a cat who looks as if he belongs in the jungle..

     

    Personality

     

    The Bengal may look like a wild cat, but breeders insist that the Bengal is as lovably friendly and docile as any full-blooded domestic cat. Fanciers describe Bengals as playful, gregarious, and energetic cats that have a generous dose of feline curiosity and that want to be involved with their family. Not intimidated by water, they will sometimes join their family for a swim, as long as it's on their terms.

    Although show-quality cats must be four generations away  from the leopard cat to be shown, previous generations of Bengals are placed as pets; therefore, it's important to know what you're getting when acquiring a Bengal. Before getting a second generation  or third generation  Bengal, be sure that the cat is free of temperament problems.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Bengal is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He’s smart enough to get out of the way of toddlers but loves school-age children because they are a match for his energy level and curiosity. Nothing scares him, certainly not dogs, and he will happily make friends with them if they don’t give him any trouble. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Briman

    The Bengal could never be called delicate. He is an athlete: agile and graceful with a strong, muscular body, as befits a cat who looks as if he belongs in the jungle..

     

    Personality

     

    The Bengal may look like a wild cat, but breeders insist that the Bengal is as lovably friendly and docile as any full-blooded domestic cat. Fanciers describe Bengals as playful, gregarious, and energetic cats that have a generous dose of feline curiosity and that want to be involved with their family. Not intimidated by water, they will sometimes join their family for a swim, as long as it's on their terms.

    Although show-quality cats must be four generations away  from the leopard cat to be shown, previous generations of Bengals are placed as pets; therefore, it's important to know what you're getting when acquiring a Bengal. Before getting a second generation  or third generation  Bengal, be sure that the cat is free of temperament problems.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Bengal is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He’s smart enough to get out of the way of toddlers but loves school-age children because they are a match for his energy level and curiosity. Nothing scares him, certainly not dogs, and he will happily make friends with them if they don’t give him any trouble. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Bombay

    This is a smart cat who loves to play and will thrive with a family who is willing to teach him tricks, play games with him and provide him with plenty of interactive toys.

     

    Personality

     

    If an aloof, independent cat is what you're craving, this breed isn't for you. Bombays are attached to their family, and tend to love the entire family rather than bond with only one person. Fanciers say they are particularly good with children.

    They want constant attention, although they are gentle and polite in their attempts to gain your notice. When you sit down, don't be surprised to find your Bombay sitting beside you moments later. Curious and intelligent, Bombays love to play, but are not as rambunctious as some breeds. Generally, they are not as vocal as the Oriental breeds.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The outgoing Bombay is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Britisch Shorthair

    Full of British reserve, the Shorthair has a quiet voice and is an undemanding companion.

     

    Personality

     

    If you're looking for a cat that will loot your refrigerator and swing dizzily from your chandeliers, then the British Shorthair is not for you. Brits are quiet, even-tempered, undemanding cats with a bit of typical British reserve, particularly when they're first introduced. When they get over their initial shyness, however, they become extremely faithful companions. British Shorthairs tend to show their loyalty to the entire family rather than select one person with whom to bond. British Shorthair breeders describe Brits as cats that like to keep a low profile, sweet and affectionate but not clingy 'in-your-face' type cats. They tend to be independent and if left on their own can usually adapt quite wel

     

    Children and other pets

     

    This mild-mannered cat is well suited to life with families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect and is forgiving of clumsy toddlers. Supervise young children and show them how to pet the cat nicely. Instead of holding or carrying the cat, have them sit on the floor and pet him. Other cats will not disturb his equilibrium. For best results, always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Burmese

    The Burmese is often described as a “brick wrapped in silk,” a testament to his solid, muscular body.

     

    Personality

     

    Breeders and fanciers report that Burmese are amusing, playful, and super-smart, the perfect interactive cats for home, office, shop, any place where people are in need of love and entertainment. They are as active as the Siamese and love to play. Devoted cats, Burmese are loyal and people-oriented.

    Breeders report temperament differences between males and females. The females are highly curious, active, and very emotionally involved with their family. The altered males love their humans too, but are more placid. They like to lounge about, usually on top of whatever you're doing. They take life as it comes. The only issue about which they are passionately concerned is the selected cuisine and when it will be served.

    Burmese have a unique rasp to their voices and sound a bit like cats going hoarse from too much talking. Burmese are not as talkative as their Siamese neighbors. When they have something to say, however, they'll reiterate the message until you get out your universal feline/human translator and take care of whatever it is troubling them.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Burmese is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Burmilla

    The Burmilla is adventurous but a bit of a klutz, so put away breakables when he is around.

     

    Personality

     

    The Burmilla brings together aspects of the Burmese and the Persian into one sweet, friendly package. He is quietly affectionate and gentle but more extroverted than the typical Persian. He is adventurous but a bit of a klutz, so put away breakables when he is around.

     

    Burmillas remain playful into adulthood. They love their people, but they aren’t excessively demanding of attention. When a lap is available, though, the Burmilla is there.

     

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The gentle and playful Burmilla is well suited to life with families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He can learn tricks, enjoys interactive toys, and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. Supervise young children and show them how to pet the cat nicely. Instead of holding or carrying the cat, have them sit on the floor and pet him. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Chatreux

    The Chartreux might well be compared to a mime, silent but communicative and sometimes silly.

     

    Personality

     

    Known for their hunting prowess, Chartreux cats may have been taken in by those monks long ago to rid the monastery of vermin. Today, however, Chartreux cats are popular because they make terrific companions. They are amiable, loyal, and vocally quiet, and when you sit down next to your Chartreux you invariably end up with a lap full of cat.

    Known as quiet, sweet cats, Chartreux cats also have a playful, comical side that they keep well into adulthood. They seem to have a well-developed sense of humor, and enjoy a good game of fetch or a playful romp with their friends and family. They are very intelligent cats; they quickly learn their names and will come when you call, if they're in the mood, of course

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The tolerant and gentle Chartreux fits nicely in a home with children. He is more likely to walk away than to scratch if he doesn’t like the way he is being handled. Parents with young children should always supervise interactions to make sure the cat isn’t mistreated.

     

    He is happy to live with cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together

  • Chinese Li Hua

    Smart, loyal and lively, the Li Hua is gentle with people but has a reputation as a talented hunter of rats and other vermin.

     

    Personality

     

    Smart, loyal and lively, the Li Hua is gentle with people but has a reputation as a talented hunter of rats and other vermin. His retrieval skills extend beyond rodents. One Li Hua is said to have learned to fetch the morning paper.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    This active but mild-mannered cat is well suited to life with families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He can learn tricks, enjoys interactive toys, and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. Supervise young children and show them how to pet the cat nicely. Instead of holding or carrying the cat, have them sit on the floor and pet him. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Colorpoint Shorthair

    The Colorpoint is a loyal and loving feline who will pout and pine if given little or no attention.

     

    Personality

     

    The Siamese and the Colorpoint Shorthair might differ in color, but beneath the skin they are identical. The Colorpoint Shorthair is talkative and opinionated. He will tell you exactly what he thinks, in a loud, raspy voice, and he expects you to pay attention and act on his advice. Colorpoints are extremely fond of their people. They like to be “helpful” and will follow you around and supervise your every move. When you are sitting down, a Colorpoint Shorthair will be in your lap, and at night he will be in bed with you, probably under the covers with his head on the pillow.

     

    The Colorpoint is highly intelligent, agile and athletic, and loves to play. Keep his busy brain active with puzzle toys and his body exercised with teaser toys that he can chase and a big cat tree he can climb. He is fully capable of opening doors and drawers or rifling through your purse in search of something interesting or shiny to play with. Never leave him without any form of entertainment, or you will likely come home to find that he has reprogrammed your DVR to record only nature shows or at the very least decided that your toilet paper rolls and tissue boxes look better empty.

     

    Choose a Colorpoint if you look forward to spending time with and interacting with your cat. This is a loyal and loving feline who will pout and pine if given little or no attention. In the right home, however, he thrives for years.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Colorpoint is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He gets along with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Cornish Rex

    If it weren’t insulting, it might be fair to describe the Cornish Rex as “doglike," as he's a willing retriever to thrown toys.

     

    Personality

     

    Cornish Rexes are good for folks who like having their lives run by active, inquisitive, gazelle-like felines that love a good joke, as long as it's not on them. Everything is a game to the Cornish Rex, and they can be hard to ignore when they're in a sociable mood, which is most of the time. Rexes are determinedly outgoing with their favorite humans. With their warm suede feel, they make the perfect winter lap warmer, too. They are intelligent, alert, and usually easy to handle.

    Extremely affectionate, Rexes are particularly so around dinnertime, so devoted, in fact, that you can't keep them out of your plate without a squirt bottle. Dinner will never be the same again with a purring Cornish stealing your food as soon as your back is turned, or even while you're looking.

    Some Rexes enjoy retrieving and will bring back objects for you to toss again and again. They are adept climbers, leapers, and sprinters, and have marvelously agile paws. No shelf or cupboard is safe from a persistent Cornish.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Cornish Rex is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Cymric Cat

    With a Cymric around the house, you’ve got a “watchcat” who reacts rapidly and will growl threateningly or maybe even go on the attack at the sight or sound of anything out of the ordinary

     

    Personality

     

    The personality of the Cymric has won a strong following despite the breeding challenges. Cymrics are intelligent, fun-loving cats, and they get along well with other pets, including dogs. Cymrics are particularly noted for their loyalty to their humans and enjoy spending quality time with them. As cats go, they can be easily taught tricks. Despite their playful temperament, they are gentle and nonaggressive. Their playful yet tractable dispositions are good for families with children.

    Cymrics are powerful jumpers and if sufficiently motivated will manage to breach the most secure shelf. They are also fascinated by water, as long as you don't dunk them in the nasty stuff. Perhaps this fascination comes from originating on a small piece of land surrounded by it.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    If he is introduced to them in kittenhood, the active and social Cymric is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority and can learn to leave birds and fish alone. An adult Cymric may not appreciate children as readily, especially if he is used to a quiet household. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Devon Rex

    The Devon Rex loves people and welcomes the attentions of friends and family alike.

     

    Personality

     

    Devons have been compared to pixies, elves, and, of course, space aliens for their jumbo-sized satellite-dish ears, large, mischievous 'window-to-the-soul' eyes, and ethereal appearance. Fanciers laud the 'poodle cat' (as the breed is affectionately called), as people-oriented snugglers that love nothing better than to cuddle up with you at night and wake you in the morning with hugs, kisses and purrs of affection. And since the Devon sheds less than other breeds, you can snuggle back without fear of covering yourself in cat hair.

    But there's lots of other reasons to acquire a Devon besides their coats: their loyalty, devotion, playfulness, courage, and intelligence, just to name a few of the qualities that make them a good choice for the cat-obsessed. Devons are shoulder perchers, lap sitters, tail waggers, and retrievers of tossed cat toys. They have a well-developed sense of curiosity and want to be involved in whatever you're doing, whether it's peeling potatoes for dinner or showering for a Saturday night date.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Devon Rex is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Egyptian Mau

    The Mau’s most striking characteristic is his spotted coat in silver, bronze or smoke (pale silver fur tipped in black), closely followed by his large gooseberry-green eyes.

     

    Personality

    While fanciers might at first be attracted to the Egyptian Mau's beautiful spotted coat, most become enthusiasts because of the breed's temperament and personality. Maus, like their ancestors that were invited along on the duck hunts of their Egyptian companions, love to fetch. In fact, they love any play activity that mimics hunting behavior, and if allowed outside will become very competent (some might say savage) hunters.

    That's not to say they are not devoted to the humans who pay them homage. Fanciers describe them as fiercely loyal cats that generally don't take to strangers. Once they bond with their human companions, they choose to be worshiped by their own family, rather than by the entire human race.

    While not overly talkative, Maus will let their family know if something is amiss, particularly if that something concerns their food dishes. Their voices are usually melodious and quiet. When engaged in conversation with their human companions, Maus wag their tails, tread with their feet, and make a variety of sounds that fanciers call 'chortling'.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and playful Mau is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He’s smart enough to get out of the way of toddlers but loves school-age children because they are a match for his energy level and curiosity. Nothing scares him, certainly not dogs, and he will happily make friends with them if they don’t give him any trouble. He is a skilled hunter, however, and pet birds or other small animals are probably not safe in his presence. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

     

  • European Burmese

    The European Burmese has the charm and determination of his Siamese ancestors, and his voice is soft and sweet, belying his tendency to run the household with an iron paw sheathed in velvety fur.

     

    Personality

     

    When it comes to personality, the European Burmese and the Burmese are in alignment. The European Burmese is energetic and friendly. He has the charm and determination of his Siamese ancestors, and enjoys conversation as much as that breed, but his voice is soft and sweet, belying his tendency to run the household with an iron paw sheathed in velvety fur. He is highly intelligent and seeks out human companionship, so he’s not best suited to a home where he will be left alone much of the day. If no humans will be around to engage his intellect, be sure he has the company of another pet. He gets along well with other cats and with dogs, but of course another Burmese (of either type) will be his best pal.

     

    The European Burmese is about as curious as cats come. Expect him to explore your home thoroughly and know all of its nooks and crannies. He is playful and remains so into adulthood. Tease his clever mind with interactive toys, and teach him tricks that will allow him to show off for an audience. Besides sit, roll over, wave and come, he can learn to fetch a small toy or walk on a leash. With proper early conditioning, car rides and vet visits will be a breeze.

     

    A European Burmese is a good choice if you don’t object to complete loss of privacy. This cat will want to be involved in everything you do, from reading the newspaper and working at the computer to preparing meals and watching television. He will, of course, sleep on the bed with you and may even snuggle under the covers. When you are sitting down, he will be in your lap or right next to you, waiting expectantly to be petted. You will be scolded if you ignore him. Guests will receive his full attention, and it is likely that he will win over even those who claim to dislike cats.

     

    A female European Burmese is the very definition of queenliness. She likes attention and she likes to be in charge. Males are more restful, satisfied to fill a lap. Whichever you choose, it’s likely that you will soon find yourself yearning for another.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social European Burmese is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Exotic Shorthair

    The Exotic is sweet, docile and quiet, but don’t get the idea that she is merely an adornment for the home. She loves to play when she’s not sitting in a lap or being petted

     

    Personality

     

    Some folks who don't appreciate that laid-back, mellow personality label Persians and their relatives 'furniture with fur', but in truth Exotics are playful and enjoy a good game of catching the catnip mouse between bouts of catching a few ZZZs. Because of the American Shorthair influence, Exotics are reported to be livelier than Persians, although some breeders say that the two breeds are very similar in temperament.

    Undoubtedly, the Exotic personality is, if not identical, very much like the Persian's, quiet, loyal, sweet, and affectionate. They want to be involved in their favorite humans' lives and will quietly follow them from room to room just to see what they are doing. They also enjoy hugs and cuddles, and lavish their humans with purrs and licks of affection until the thick coat drives them away to lounge on cool kitchen linoleum or cold fireplace bricks. Fanciers point out that because of the short coat, they can spend more time playing with their Exotics than grooming them

     

    Children and other pets

     

    Exotics are adaptable and can do well in homes with children who treat them nicely. They also get along with cat-friendly dogs.

  • Havana Brown Cat

    The Havana is distinguished by his uncommon head shape; it’s longer than it is wide.

     

    Personality

     

    More distinctive than the muzzle, ears, or minklike coat is the Havana Brown?s personality. Although still quite rare and for years one of the cat fancy?s best kept secrets, Havanas have built a solid following of enthusiastic fanciers. Havana Browns are affectionate, gentle, highly intelligent, and, unlike their Siamese compatriots, quiet. They are remarkably adaptable and agreeable cats, and adjust to any situation with poise and confidence.

    Havanas must have human interaction if they are to live happy, healthy lives. They crave attention from their human companions and are not content unless they can be by your side, helping you with your household tasks. Havanas love to reach out and touch their favorite humans; they often nudge their human friends with an outstretched paw as if asking for attention.

    'Fetch' is a favorite Havana Brown game, and they can often be found carrying toys and stray objects around in their mouths. If you've misplaced a sock or some other small, easily carried object, check your Havana's cat bed. You might find that it has magically found its way there.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Havana Brown is playful and smart and can be a good friend to a child who treats him nicely. He’s one of those cats who enjoys playing fetch and learning tricks, and his energy level means he won’t wear out before the child does. He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Himalayan Cat

    The Himalayan cat is a very intelligent animal, it is a sibling from the Persian.

     

    Personality

     

    Himmies, as fanciers call them, are perfect indoor cat companions. They are gentle, calm, and sweet-tempered, but they possess a playful side as well. Like the Siamese, Himalayans love to play fetch, and a scrap of crumpled paper or a kitty toy will entertain them for hours.

    Himalayans are devoted and dependent upon their humans for companionship and protection. They crave affection and love to be petted and groomed, which is fortunate, since every Himalayan family will spend part of each day doing just that.

    Like their Persian siblings, they are docile and won't harass you for attention the way some breeds will. More vocal and active than the Persian, they nevertheless are much quieter than the Siamese

     

     

    Children and other pets

    The calm and playfull catl is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

     

  • Japanse Bobtail Cat

    the Japanese Bontail breed’s tell-tale characteristic is a short “bunny” tail that can be flexible or rigid, with one or more curves, angles or kinks

     

    Personality

     

    Bobs make outstanding companions. They're curious, bold, intelligent, and alert, and easily adjust to new people, situations, and animals, making them easy cats to show. Bobtails are active, but not annoyingly so. Their play is interactive and endearing. They want to be involved with their human companions and are more than willing to lend a paw when you need it (and even when you don't). Bobtails also enjoy a good conversation; they have chirping voices that produce a wide range of tones, some breeders describe this as 'singing.'

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Bobtail is a great match for families with kids because he shares their high energy level. He is up for anything, from playing fetch to being a guest at a tea party to being dressed up in doll clothes and paraded around in a baby buggy. Always  supervise children to make sure they pet and play with the cat nicely and don’t pull his ears or twist his tail. He is happy to live with cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable and fearless disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Javanese Cat

    The Javanese is highly intelligent, agile and athletic, and loves to pla

     

    Personality

     

    Javanese cats, like their Balinese relatives, are playful, devoted, and always eager to tell you their views on life, love, and what you've served them for dinner. Javanese (and their Siamese relatives) have a fascination with food, and, while some will burn off the extra calories in playful antics, care must be taken that the less active don't turn into butterballs.

    Known for their curiosity, intelligence, and excellent communication skills, the Javanese breed is perfect if you want a responsive, interactive cat, one that will blow in your ear and follow you everywhere. Their meows seem definite attempts to communicate, and they look you directly in the eye and seem to answer when spoken to. Fanciers say that the Javanese are easy to train, and are not quite as demanding of your time and energy as are Siamese.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Javanese is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Corat Cat

    The silver-blue cats with the emerald-green eyes are said to date to the 14th century based on their depiction in ancient literature

     

    Personality

     

    Korats are not as vocal as their Siamese comrades; they have other ways of getting their wishes across. At dinnertime they'll wrap themselves around your ankle, clamber up onto your shoulder, and perhaps give you a nip on the shin if you don't hurry up with the cat food, but given something important to say, they speak their minds.

    On the cat activity level scale, they are an 8: social, playful, and full of life, but not bouncing-off-the-walls hyper. They are also reported to possess high intelligence.

    Like the Siamese, Korats are fetchers of tossed toys, cats whose favorite game is the one in which you take an active part. Korats crave affection from their humans, and will scheme to gain possession of your lap, your arms, and your heart.

     

     

    Children and other pets

     

    Korats will appreciate the attentions of a child who treats them respectfully, and they enjoy playing and learning tricks. With proper supervision, they can be a good companion for children.

     

    Like many cats that originated in Southeast Asia, Korats tend to prefer other Korats. They can get along with other cats, and with dogs, but they expect to have pride of place. This may or may not go over well with other animals. The Korat likes to have company, however, and if he spends a lot of time with another cat or dog, they will likely become close friends.

  • Laperm Cat

    The LaPerm’s outstanding feature, of course, is his coat, which has loose, bouncy curls, making it light and airy to the touch

     

    Personality

     

    The clever LaPerm has a sense of humor. Often described as clownish, he is something of a mischief-maker who makes talented use of his paws to open doors, swipe things he wants or tap you on the shoulder for attention. He’s not clingy, but he likes to be with you and will follow you around, sit on your shoulder or the top of your computer, or sit in your lap, whichever option is most convenient for him. He is moderately active and enjoys retrieving items that are thrown for him.

    Despite his reputation for getting into things, the LaPerm is pleasant to live with. He rarely uses his voice, and he is affectionate, gentle and patient with his people. Most are also welcoming to visitors as long as they were well socialized as kittens.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The easygoing but playful LaPerm is well suited to life with families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He can learn tricks, enjoys interactive toys, and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. Supervise young children and show them how to pet the cat nicely. Instead of holding or carrying the cat, have them sit on the floor and pet him. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Maine Coon

    The Maine Coon is a native New Englander, hailing from Maine, where he was a popular mouser, farm cat and, most likely, ship’s cat, at least as far back as the early 19th century.

     

    Personality

     

    No breed has a monopoly on love and affection, but there's got to be some good reason that the Maine Coon has clawed his way up from near extinction to the prized place of America's second most popular breed (according to the CFA's registration totals). Maine Coon fanciers say that the popularity is due to the breed's large size, intelligence, luxuriant coat, hardy disposition, and devotion to their human family.

    While Maine Coons are devoted, playful, and loving to their chosen humans, they can be reserved around people with whom they're not familiar. Given time, however, even the most cautious adapt. As befits a former seafarer, Maine Coons are fascinated by water, perhaps because their thick coats are water-repellent and won't become annoyingly soaked as easily as a thinner coat would.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The friendly, laidback Maine Coon  is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect, and he doesn’t mind playing dress-up or going for a ride in a baby buggy.

     

    He is happy to live with cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

     

  • Manc Cat

    The tailless Manx is the result of a genetic mutation that was then intensified by the cats’ remote location on the Isle of Man, off the coast of Britain

     

    Personality

     

    The Manx's personality is probably the reason the breed has won such a strong following despite the physical difficulties and breeding challenges. Manx cats make great household companions. They are intelligent, active, and fun-loving cats that manage to express themselves very well without tails to swish around. Manx get along well with other pets (particularly dogs), and form strong bonds with their chosen humans. They enjoy a good game of fetch and are fascinated by water, but only on their terms, of course. Manx are exceptional jumpers because of their powerful back legs. No cupboard or shelf is safe with a Manx around.

    The Manx is known for its unusual rabbit-like gait, known as the 'Manx hop.' While some breeders and fanciers consider the walk to be a result of skeletal abnormalities related to the Manx gene, others consider it merely a result of the short back and the long hind legs as noted in the Manx standard.

     

     

    Children and other pets

     

    If he is introduced to them in kittenhood, the active and social Manx is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority and can learn to leave birds and fish alone. An adult Manx may not appreciate children as readily, especially if he is used to a quiet household. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

     

  • Munchkin Cat

    For their part, Munchkins, oblivious to the controversy surrounding them, go on being just what they are, cats; self-assured and outgoing.

     

    Personality

     

    They love to wrestle and play with their long-legged feline friends, happily unaware that there's anything different about them. Nor do their feline companions treat them like members of the vertically challenged. Only humans look at them askance.

    Fanciers assert Munchkins can do anything an ordinary cat can do, except leap to the top of the bookcase. They can get on the kitchen counter, but they take the scenic route. Munchkins are also known as 'magpies', often borrowing small, shiny objects and stashing them away for later play. Proficient hunters, Munchkins love a good game of catnip mouse, but when playtime is over, they want a warm lap to snuggle into and strokes from a loving hand, like any domestic.

     

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Munchkin is well suited to any home with people who will love him and care for him. Keep him indoors to protect him from cars, diseases spread by other cats, and attacks from other animals and he can live 13 years or longer.

     

     

  • Nebelung Cat

    The name Nebelung is German and means “creature of the mist,” a reference to the cat’s shimmering silvery-blue coat that seems to float over his body

     

    Personality

     

    Nebelungs are mild, soft-spoken, and gentle. They are generally reserved around strangers, ranging from hiding-under-the-bed timid to warily eyeing intruders from a safe distance. Given humans' unpredictable behavior, this could be interpreted as a sign of extreme intelligence.

    To their family, Nebelungs are like Russian Blues, affectionate and playful although not intrusive. They tend to bond with a select few humans and stay loving and devoted throughout their lives.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    Nebelungs have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully, but they can be wary of younger children who pet them clumsily. Always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.

    The Nebelung is accepting of other animals, including dogs, as long as they aren’t chased or menaced by them. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together

  • Neva Masquerade ( ANAIS)

    The Neva Masquerade is considered a hypoallergenic breed. It is thought to produce less Fel d 1, the substance on a cat that causes most allergies.

     

    Personality

     

    Neva Masquerades have a number of almost dog-like characteristics. They are very intelligent and have excellent problem solving skills. These agile animals are able to leap quite high and yet are graceful enough to walk around obstacles without hitting or breaking them.

     

    If you share your home with a Neva Masquerade you will never be alone. They will watch TV with you, go to the restroom with you and then go to bed with you. If you are trying to do something, they will insist on helping. Reading a newspaper, book, or magazine is next to impossible. If they like something, they will take it and play with it and in the process it will be lost.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    They enjoy the company of dogs, other animals, and children. They are fearless and easygoing. Not much disturbs their natural calm and equanimity. Many parents affirm that their Siberian will always sleep with the children at the foot of their bed as a sentinel. Some Siberians become the nurse in the family, spending time with the sick person who needs the support. They have a high level of intuition and know when they are needed for psychological and moral support. They get out of your way when you are tense and too busy to deal with them. However, there are those who are under foot no matter what. Through all the hard times in life, Siberians have given support if only for a headache.

  • Norwegian Forest Cat

    The gentle and friendly Norwegian Forest Cat — Wegie, for short — is fond of family members but does not demand constant attention and petting.

     

    Personality

     

    Natural athletes, Norwegian Forest Cats love to investigate counters, bookcases, and the loftiest peaks of their cat trees. Wegies are active and playful and retain their fun-loving spirit well into adulthood, but don't be fooled by the breed's impressive muscles and all-weather exterior. They are sweet, friendly, and family-oriented, and they love their human companions. Despite the wild years in the forests of Norway, or perhaps because of it, they would much rather cuddle than prowl.

    Because of those harsh survival years (perhaps), nothing fazes them much, either. They take new people and new situations in stride; as cats go, Forest Cats are the strong, silent types. They are conversely great purrers, particularly when perched beside their favorite humans. Out-going and gregarious, they tend not to bond with one person, but rather love everyone unconditionally and enthusiastically.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The friendly, laidback Norwegian Forest Cat  is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect, and he doesn’t mind playing dress-up or going for a ride in a baby buggy.

    He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Ocicat

    The Ocicat's favorite activities include retrieving toys and learning to walk on a leash.

     

    Personality

     

    Ocicats may look wild, but they are actually affectionate, curious, and playful, and possess a very strong devotion to their human companions. Highly intelligent, Ocicats quickly learn to respond to their names and can be taught a variety of tricks, including coming on command. Begging for food is another trick that Ocicats master with very little prompting. They tend to bond with only one person and prefer that person's company to all others. They do get along well with other animals and people, however, and appreciate an animal companion to keep them company if left alone for any length of time.

    Like their Abyssinian ancestors, Ocicats love to perform daring tap dances on top of your bookcases for your amusement. They are an active breed and require a good deal of space and plenty of toys and diversions to keep them occupied. Like their Siamese ancestors, Ocicats are vocal, but not annoyingly so. They want to tell you about their day when you come home at night, but they won't bore you with every detail. Also, their voices lack the Siamese rasp that some people find annoying.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The gentle and playful Ocicat is well suited to life with families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He can learn tricks, enjoys interactive toys, and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. Supervise young children and show them how to pet the cat nicely. Instead of holding or carrying the cat, have them sit on the floor and pet him.

     

    It’s likely that the Ocicat will dominate other cats in the household and may even rule the dogs. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Oriental Cat

    Orientals are extremely fond of their people and will tell you exactly what they think, in a loud, raspy voice.

     

    Personality

     

    The personality of the Oriental is as distinctive as the multicolored exterior. They are natural entertainers, full of enthusiasm, energy, and the belief that the world should revolve around them. Haughty and royal one minute, they are animated and inquisitive the next. They are highly curious, and will go to great lengths to be involved in your activities.

    Orientals' feelings are easily hurt if you ignore them but, given their full share of affection, Oriental Shorthairs will repay you with a lifetime of love, affection, and intelligent conversation. They usually bond with one person and become extremely devoted and dependent upon their chosen human. Expect them to be at your side, in your lap, and at the door to interrogate you about where you've been.

    The breed?'s vocal tone is generally softer and milder than that of the Siamese, but the range, frequency, and inflection vary from cat to cat. Like their Siamese relatives, they are never at a loss for words on any subject.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Oriental is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He gets along with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Persian Cat

    The dignified and docile Persian is known for being quiet and sweet.

     

    Personality

     

    If you want your cats bouncing around like hyperactive popcorn, don't buy a Persian. Persians are perfect companions, if you like placid, sweet-tempered cats. Don't count on using your Persian pal as a furry doorstop, however. They love to play between periods of regal lounging on your favorite davenport. Proponents say that Persians do not deserve their 'furniture with fur' reputation, they are intelligent, just not as inquisitive as some breeds, and not as active.

    Persians are devoted to their humans, but can be selective in conferring that honor. You must earn their trust and love. They crave affection and love to be petted and fussed over, but won't harass you for attention the way some breeds will. They will, however, let their feelings be known if they are not getting the requisite amount of attention.

    Owning a Persian requires a significant time commitment. That beautiful coat requires daily grooming to keep it in good condition and free of mats. Because of the long coat and docile temperament, Persians should be considered indoor-only pets. Many Persian fanciers keep at least part of the coat clipped, particularly the hindquarters and around the anus to avoid the accumulation of feces. This should be done, though, only if the cat will not be shown soon.

     

     

    Children and other pets

     

    Persians aren’t the best choice for a houseful of boisterous children and dogs, but they have no objection to being the object of a gentle child’s attentions or to rubbing along with a friendly dog who doesn’t chase them or otherwise cause them anxiety.

  • Ragamuffin

    The Ragamuffin is known for his docile nature. He loves to be held like a baby and will completely relax into your arms.

     

    Personality

     

    Like his cousin the Ragdoll, the Ragamuffin is a huggable lug who wants nothing more than to follow his people around and sit in a lap whenever possible. A nice combination of sweet and smart, he is often described as puppylike for his friendly personality and willingness to play fetch, learn tricks and walk on a leash. He greets visitors warmly and would meet you at the door with a martini if only he had opposable thumbs.

    The Ragamuffin is known for his docile nature. He loves to be held like a baby and will completely relax into your arms. Ragamuffins like to play but are good about limiting their attentions to their toys and scratching posts, not your furniture. It is rare to nonexistent for them to lay a claw on a person.

    This is a mellow cat but one who craves attention. Don’t get a Ragamuffin if you will have to leave him alone for many hours every day.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The calm and even-tempered Ragamuffin is an ideal family cat. He doesn’t mind being held or carried around by a child or dressed up and pushed in a baby buggy. He is playful and smart, one of those cats who enjoys playing fetch and learning tricks, and his energy level means he won’t wear out before the child does.

    Always teach children how to hold the cat properly, supporting both the hind end and the front end, and have little children pet him while they are sitting on the floor or on a sofa so they can be on the same level as the cat without trying to hold him. After all, he may weigh more than they do.

    The Ragamuffin is also friendly toward other pets, including dogs, other cats, birds, rodents and lizards. To this gentle giant, everyone is his friend. Nonetheless, it’s always a good idea to introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together

  • Ragdoll

    The Bengal could never be called delicate. He is an athlete: agile and graceful with a strong, muscular body, as befits a cat who looks as if he belongs in the jungle..

     

    Personality

     

    Docile, mild-mannered, and congenial, Rag-dolls make ideal indoor companions. One of the nicest features of these cats is their laid-back, sweet personality. They are playful but are not overactive. Known to adapt easily to their environment, Ragdolls get along well with children and adults, as well as cats and dogs. They are easily trained to stay off the counter and are affectionate without being overly demanding. They have soft, polite voices, even at dinnertime, even though they are renowned for their enthusiasm for food.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The laidback Ragdoll is perfectly suited to family life. He rarely extends his claws when playing, and he usually doesn’t mind playing dress-up, riding in a baby buggy or being a guest at a tea party. Because of their large size, males are an especially good choice for families with children.

    Of course, you should always supervise young children to make sure they don’t torment the cat. And with a cat this size, it’s essential to teach children how to support the cat, with one arm beneath the front legs and one beneath the hind legs. Never hold a Ragdoll with the hind end hanging down.

    He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

     

  • Russian Blue

    The Russian Blue’s elegant yet muscular body led one cat judge to proclaim him the “Doberman Pinscher of cats.”

     

    Personality

     

    Russian Blues are gentle, genteel cats, and are usually reserved, or absent, when strangers are around. When they're with their own beloved humans, however, they are affectionate and playful. Russian Blues are active but not annoyingly so. They like nothing better than to spend time retrieving a favorite toy or chasing sunbeams. They willingly entertain themselves, but prefer that their favorite humans join in the fun. When you're home, they follow you around, unobtrusive but ever-present companions. The slight upturn to the corners of the mouth makes most Russian Blues appear to be forever smiling.

    Russian Blues like their usual routine and dislike environmental changes more than the average cat. They particularly dislike changes to their dinner schedule. They are also fastidious about their litter boxes and will complain if they're not spic and span.

    The members of this breed are polite, quiet, and well-behaved. It is easy to train them to stay off counters and out of off-limit areas with a simple 'No', but Russian Blues seem to think politeness should go both ways and take offense at being made to look silly. You can trust them to know when you're laughing at them and they won't soon forget it either.

     

    Children and other pets

    Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.

    The Russian Blue is also accepting of other animals, including dogs, as long as they aren’t chased or menaced by them. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Scottisch Fold

    There is nothing a Scottish Fold — named for his folded ears — likes better than to be with his people, participating in whatever they are doing.

     

    Personality

     

    Scottish Folds are intelligent, sweet-tempered, soft-spoken, and easily adaptable to new people and situations. They are very loyal and tend to bond with one person in the household. While they will usually allow others to cuddle and pet them, their primary attachment becomes quickly clear as they single out their chosen humans. They thrive on attention, but it must be on their own terms.

    Despite their devotion, they are not clingy, demanding cats and usually prefer to be near you rather than on your lap. They enjoy a good game of fetch now and then as well, and keep their playful side well into adulthood. Despite the breeding and health difficulties, Folds have certainly earned their standing in the cat fancy.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The friendly, laidback Scottish Fold is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect, and he likes to play and is capable of learning tricks.

    He is happy to live with cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Selkirk Cat

    Tolerant and affectionate, the Selkirk is not always a lap cat, but he likes people and other animals

     

    Personality

     

    Selkirks are fun-loving, mellow cats with a generous measure of love and affection for their human companions. Very people-oriented, they stay playful and kittenish even as adults. They're very social and don't do well in isolation.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The gentle but social Selkirk Rex is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Siamese Cat

    The sophisticated Siamese looks dressed for an elegant masquerade ball in pale evening wear with chic black accessories and tanzanite-blue eyes.

     

    Personality

     

    Some cats seem to think that a purr or a friendly rub speaks louder than words. Siamese are not of this school of thought and are known for their talent for communicating their ideas and desires clearly to their chosen humans. If you can't be drawn into dialogue, they're happy to keep up a running monologue for your enlightenment. No meaningless meows, these, but real attempts at communication, according to Siamese fans. To some cat lovers, who prefer their felines to be seen and not heard, the Siamese rasp (some would say yowl) can be a bit annoying. But Siamese worshipers wouldn't have it any other way.

    Determinedly social and very dependent upon their humans, Siamese crave active involvement in your life. Like Mary's little lamb, they want to follow wherever you may go. Siamese can be unpredictable in their behavior and can appear aloof and disinterested, but it's all an act. Siamese need to be treated with respect and patience and require lots of affection if they are to develop a close, caring relationship with their human companions. Siamese will pine if left too often alone.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Siamese is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect.

  • Sibirian Cat

    From Russia with love: that’s the Siberian, a glamorous native cat from the taiga of Siberia, a forested area with a subarctic climate that no doubt contributed to this cat’s long, thick, protective coat.

     

    Personality

     

    Siberians are affectionate cats with a good dose of personality and playfulness. They are amenable to handling, and breeders note that Siberians have a fascination with water, often dropping toys into their water dishes or investigating bathtubs before they're dry. Siberians seem very intelligent, with the ability to problem-solve to get what they want. Despite their size, they are very agile and are great jumpers, able to leap tall bookcases in a single bound.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Siberian has a bold temperament, and nothing much ruffles his composure. These characteristics make him an excellent choice for a family with kids. No nighttime monsters will get past the Siberian on guard at the foot of a child’s bed. He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, as long as they recognize that he’s in charge. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Singapura

    The Singapura has three distinguishing characteristics: His small size of 4 to 8 pounds, big eyes and ears for his size, and his sepia-toned coat that gives him the look of having stepped out of a 19th century photograph.

     

    Personality

     

    Singapuras, happily unaware of the controversy surrounding them, go right on being what they are: pesky people pleasers. At home in any situation, Puras love to be the center of attention and they don't seem to understand the word 'stranger', they want to be there with you to welcome your guests. They're curious, people-oriented, and remain playful well into adulthood. Their voices are quiet and unobtrusive, and they trust their humans implicitly.

    Puras are not quite as active as Abyssinians, but they are spirited nevertheless. They're curious, affectionate, almost too intelligent, and seem very much in tune with their favorite humans' moods.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Singapura is playful and smart and can be a good friend to a child who treats him nicely. He’s one of those cats who enjoys playing fetch and learning tricks, and his energy level means he won’t wear out before the child does. He is happy to live with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, too, thanks to his amiable disposition. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

    Singapuras usually get along well with other animals and seem to prefer living with some kind of company, not thriving when left alone all day.

     

  • Snowshoe Cat

    Forget the Grumpy Cat stereotype: this Siamese-American Shorthair mix’s affectionate and sweet disposition is supplemented by distinctive fur markings and a strong body.

     

    Personality

     

    Breeders brave enough to take on the Snowshoe challenge find that the cat pays back the effort in love and affection. Anyone looking for an aloof, standoffish cat need not apply for Snowshoe ownership, fanciers claim that Snowshoes don't realize that they're cats; they consider themselves people. They love to touch and be touched. Very intelligent, they can be taught a number of tricks. Snowshoes are also known for their fascination with water and on occasion will climb into the tub for a swim, as long as it's their idea. While not as loud or vocal as the Siamese, Snowshoes are never at a loss for words.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Snowshoe is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. She will play fetch as well as any Retriever, learns tricks easily, and appreciates the attention she receives from children who treat her politely and with respect.

  • Somali Cat

    Like his sibling the Abyssinian, the Somali lives life to the fullest. He climbs higher, jumps farther, plays harder. Nothing escapes the notice of this highly intelligent and inquisitive cat.

     

    Personality

     

    With all the virtues of the Abyssinian and adorned by a gorgeous semi-long coat, the Somali is a beautiful and lively addition to any household. Don't get a Somali if you want a cat that can be taken for a furry doorstop, or if you want a cat that will do your bidding. Like the Abyssinian, the Somali is active, curious, and high-spirited, and loves to prance around the house, opening cupboards and generally getting into mischief. Their voices are soft, their minds active, and their food dishes are always empty. They also tend to be determined cats: Once they get an idea in their furry little heads, there's no dissuading them. They're not aggressive or unfriendly, just tenacious.

    Somalis are affectionate, but are not lap cats. They don't like to be cuddled and would rather be near than on you. They do, however, want to be involved in every aspect of your life. Open a drawer and your Somali will be there to peer in.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Somali is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He’s smart enough to get out of the way of toddlers but loves school-age children because they are a match for his energy level and curiosity. Nothing scares him, certainly not dogs, and he will happily make friends with them if they don’t give him any trouble. Somalis have also been known to get along with large parrots, ferrets and other animals. Always introduce any pets, even other cats, slowly and in a controlled setting.

  • Sphynx Cat

    It’s a good thing that the hairless Sphynx loves attention because he draws it wherever he goes. He is demanding of human attention and will do anything for a laugh.

     

    Personality

     

    According to the French breed standard, the Sphynx is part monkey, part dog, part child, and part cat. The breed does seem to possess some personality traits of each, despite what geneticists might say about such a combination. To say Sphynxes are lively is an understatement; they perform monkey-like aerialist feats from the top of doorways and bookshelves. Very devoted and loyal, they follow their humans around, wagging their tails doggy fashion and purring with affection. They demand your unconditional attention and are as mischievous (and lovable) as children. And despite all that and their alien appearance, they are completely cats, with all the mystery and charm that has fascinated humankind for thousands of years. While the Sphynx may not be for everyone, his unique appearance and charming temperament has won him an active, enthusiastic following.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Sphynx is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with dogs and other cats. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Tonikese Cat

    If you think of cats as being aloof and independent, it’s only because you haven’t yet met a Tonkinese.

     

    Personality

     

    The Tonkinese has a winsome personality, not surprising since the Burmese and Siamese are prized for their temperaments. Faithful followers say the Tonkinese has the best of both breeds. His voice is milder in tone than the Siamese; however, he does believe in feline free speech and wants to share all of the day's adventures with you when you come home in the evening. The Tonkinese craves, and returns, affection and companionship. Unlike the rest of your busy family, he will always join you for dinner. He has an unflagging enthusiasm for life and life's pleasures, and loves interactive toys such as human fingers and the tails of his cat companions. He makes every close encounter a game. While Tonkinese cats willingly adapt to humans and animals alike, they may annoy more sedate breeds and therefore might do better with members of their own breed or other active breeds.

    Tonkinese are particularly popular among cat lovers who remember the Traditional Siamese and want a cat with a less extreme body style than currently exists in the show Siamese. The waiting list can therefore be long, since numbers are currently low.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The active and social Tonkinese is a perfect choice for families with children and cat-friendly dogs. He will play fetch as well as any retriever, learns tricks easily and loves the attention he receives from children who treat him politely and with respect. He lives peacefully with cats and dogs who respect his authority. Always introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Turkish Angora

    Once the Turkish Angora gets an idea into his head, it can be difficult to change his mind about how he should behave, but he is so charming that you probably won’t care.

     

    Personality

     

    Turkish Angora fanciers are as attached to their cats as their cats are to them. Angoras seem to invoke strong responses in their humans with their symmetry, intelligence, and devotion to their humans. Angoras bond with their families completely; an Angora is not happy unless he is right in the middle of whatever you're doing. They enjoy a good conversation and can keep up their end of the discussion with the best of them. Angoras are good-natured, but determined. Once an Angora gets an idea into his head, you might as well just give in and spare yourself the lengthy argument.

    Angoras have a great need to play and enjoy playing a good-natured joke on their favorite humans every now and then. They can be mischievous and action-packed when they're in the mood. Angoras love practicing their pounce on scraps of paper or unsuspecting human toes, whatever catches their fancy. When in movement, which is most of the time, Angoras seem to flow with the grace of dancers. Highly intelligent, Angoras are problem solvers that like to be in control of their surroundings; they will only tolerate being held for a few minutes before jumping down to bat at sunbeams and chase feathers. They'll stay in the room, though, so you can watch their antics admiringly.

    Along with his cousin the Turkish Van, the Angora is known for his swimming prowess, and will even plunge in for an occasional swim. Not every Turkish Angora enjoys water, but many do, with varying degrees of enthusiasm.

     

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Angora who has been well socialized is comfortable with kids, making him a good choice for families who will supervise children to make sure they pet the cat nicely and don’t pull his fur or tail. He is happy to live with cat-friendly dogs, too, as long as they recognize that he’s in charge. Introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.

  • Turkish Van Cat

    He’s not much of a lap cat, but the Van will be happy to cuddle next to you and sleep in your bed.

     

    Personality

     

    While you might be drawn to the Van for his fascination with water, you'll fall in love with the breed for his other qualities. 'Vans are energetic, agile, and intelligent. They are extremely healthy and, get along with people swimmingly,' notes one Van owner. You may need a few months of working out to keep up with them, however; Vans are famous for their 'action-packed' temperament. They are talkative, demanding of attention, and show great gusto at dinnertime. Breeders also say that Vans are known for their attachment to their human companions, and sometimes that makes transferring a Van from one household to another difficult. They tend to pick out one or two people in the household, usually the ones that deal with them initially, and bond with them forever.

     

    Children and other pets

     

    The Van who has been well socialized is comfortable with kids, making him a good choice for families with active children who will enjoy running around with a teaser toy, throwing a ball for the cat to fetch, or teaching tricks. Supervise young children to make sure they pet the cat nicely and don’t pull his fur or tail.

    The Turkish Van is happy to live with cat-friendly dogs, too, as long as they recognize that he’s in charge. When it comes to cats, he prefers the company of his own kind, but he will accept other cats, especially if he is brought up with them from kittenhood. In any case, introduce pets slowly and in controlled circumstances to ensure that they learn to get along together.